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Mix series with a special treat from Odd Future’s The Internet today. Syd the Kyd and Matt Martians are redefining the term eclectic with this mix as the duo has put together a selection that links current club favorites such as Disclosure’s “Latch,” Katy B and Sampha’s “Play” with classic jams such as D’Angelo’s “Lady,” David Bowie’s “Fame” and James Brown’s “The Payback.” Aptly titled “Summer,” the piece also marks a historic moment for the band since it’s their first Ableton mix.

HYPETRAK Mix: The Internet - Summer (Tracklist)

Raleigh Ritchie - Stronger Than Ever (The Internet Remix)
Disclosure featuring Sam Smith - Latch
Katy B featuring Sampha - Play
Teedra Moses - Be Your Girl (Kaytranada Remix)
The Pharcyde - She Said (Jay Dee Remix)
ScHoolBoy Q - Collard Greens
Esperanza Spalding - Ponta De Areia
Skybourne featuring Big K.R.I.T. & Smoke DZA - Curren$y
D’Angelo - Lady
Mayor Hawthorne - Her Favorite Song
David Bowie - Fame
James Brown - The Payback
Stevie Wonder - Too High
Al B. Sure! - Nite And Day
Brandy - Movin’ On
YG featuring Drake - Who Do You Love
Dogg Pound - Cali Iz Active
De La Soul featuring Zhane - 4 More
Pharrell - Gush

ALBUM REVIEW: CONVERGE “ALL WE LOVE WE LEAVE BEHIND”
Converge present themselves as hardcore-punk ascetics, studio rats born to create brutal, convoluted maelstroms — and that’s about it. Some band members say they don’t pay attention to much music besides their own; others insist their purpose is to express, not entertain. And as for commerce, forget it: As lead singer Jacob Bannon recently put it, “Success, to me, is creating something that’s moving and fulfilling.”
It’s a simple, mature outlook from musical wizards who seem content to peek out from behind the curtain but never fully emerge. Which makes it difficult to be a fan of Converge, at least in the Beatlemania sense — in lieu of distinct extra-musical personalities, would you settle for limited-edition multicolored vinyl? But over the course of a two-decade career, they’ve inspired a rabid fan base, anyway, drawn to the inherent complexity of records like their latest, All We Love We Leave Behind.
The Massachusetts band’s eighth studio LP finds our heroes at their jazziest, a tendency foreshadowed early in their career, well before they dove deep into metal on 2001 touchstoneJane Doe. But don’t worry: Whether dialing down the distortion for opener “Aimless Arrow” or letting their fusion freak flags fly on the scattershot “Veins and Veils,” Converge simultaneously play hardcore smart enough to appeal to metalheads and metal base enough to appeal to the mosh-pit acrobats at hardcore shows.
The star this time out is guitarist and producer Kurt Ballou, who artfully, dare we saytastefully, embellishes every tune with brief, bracing filigrees of feedback and melodic bedlam. While many hardcore guitarists are content playing revved-up versions of the same blocky chords and boxy, deconstructed-Ramones riffs, Converge’s axeman claws at murky, eccentric patterns that paint a more intricate picture than what comes with the usual 1-2-3-4-go routine. It’s part of his DNA, exacerbated by the band’s far-reaching influences: Their taste in cover songs over the years has played up their alt-rock roots (the Cure, Depeche Mode), their metal proclivities (Black Sabbath, Entombed), and a few hardcore-punk favorites (Negative Approach, Black Flag).
Which explains the all the wild stuff that inspires All We Love's various guitargasms: Greg Ginn's damaged, free-jazz experimentalism on later Black Flag albums surfaces on “Trespasses,” which fuses Ballou's feedback to discordant blues scales. Nominal ballad “Coral Blue” boasts a moody, darkly understated atmosphere that still generates plenty of aggression — ultimately, it sounds like a very scary pop song. Echoes of power metal creep into the title cut with its driving, stream-of-consciousness riff, while the intro to “Sadness Come Home” is a bluesy, chopped-and-screwed reprise of the beloved chord-sliding fury that ends Jane Doe's “Concubine” (think of it as their “Country Honk”).
The only weak link here is Bannon’s lyrics, which tend toward the maudlin and over-conceptual: “I am that aimless arrow, lost from the very start / Violence without purpose, born of broken hearts.” Then, of course, there’s the cloyingly reductive album title (though it does earn points for antagonizing U2). But you’ll forget all about that by the time you get to the noisy, screechy “Empty on the Inside,” which seems to incorporate all those aforementioned touchstones at once — bluesy fills, feedback, a driving bass line from Nate Newton, soaring guitars, militaristic drums — to create the album’s most unsettling, hypnotic moment.
That Converge can dabble in so many styles and still inherently come out sounding like themselves is what makes All We Love work. And besides, there are enough tortured screams and catastrophic riffs strewn about this LP’s 38 minutes to carry fans another three years, until the boys conceive their next multicolored, limited-edition musical apocalypse. Maybe that’s all the personality they need.

ALBUM REVIEW: CONVERGE “ALL WE LOVE WE LEAVE BEHIND”

Converge present themselves as hardcore-punk ascetics, studio rats born to create brutal, convoluted maelstroms — and that’s about it. Some band members say they don’t pay attention to much music besides their own; others insist their purpose is to express, not entertain. And as for commerce, forget it: As lead singer Jacob Bannon recently put it, “Success, to me, is creating something that’s moving and fulfilling.”

It’s a simple, mature outlook from musical wizards who seem content to peek out from behind the curtain but never fully emerge. Which makes it difficult to be a fan of Converge, at least in the Beatlemania sense — in lieu of distinct extra-musical personalities, would you settle for limited-edition multicolored vinyl? But over the course of a two-decade career, they’ve inspired a rabid fan base, anyway, drawn to the inherent complexity of records like their latest, All We Love We Leave Behind.

The Massachusetts band’s eighth studio LP finds our heroes at their jazziest, a tendency foreshadowed early in their career, well before they dove deep into metal on 2001 touchstoneJane Doe. But don’t worry: Whether dialing down the distortion for opener “Aimless Arrow” or letting their fusion freak flags fly on the scattershot “Veins and Veils,” Converge simultaneously play hardcore smart enough to appeal to metalheads and metal base enough to appeal to the mosh-pit acrobats at hardcore shows.

The star this time out is guitarist and producer Kurt Ballou, who artfully, dare we saytastefully, embellishes every tune with brief, bracing filigrees of feedback and melodic bedlam. While many hardcore guitarists are content playing revved-up versions of the same blocky chords and boxy, deconstructed-Ramones riffs, Converge’s axeman claws at murky, eccentric patterns that paint a more intricate picture than what comes with the usual 1-2-3-4-go routine. It’s part of his DNA, exacerbated by the band’s far-reaching influences: Their taste in cover songs over the years has played up their alt-rock roots (the Cure, Depeche Mode), their metal proclivities (Black Sabbath, Entombed), and a few hardcore-punk favorites (Negative Approach, Black Flag).

Which explains the all the wild stuff that inspires All We Love's various guitargasms: Greg Ginn's damaged, free-jazz experimentalism on later Black Flag albums surfaces on “Trespasses,” which fuses Ballou's feedback to discordant blues scales. Nominal ballad “Coral Blue” boasts a moody, darkly understated atmosphere that still generates plenty of aggression — ultimately, it sounds like a very scary pop song. Echoes of power metal creep into the title cut with its driving, stream-of-consciousness riff, while the intro to “Sadness Come Home” is a bluesy, chopped-and-screwed reprise of the beloved chord-sliding fury that ends Jane Doe's “Concubine” (think of it as their “Country Honk”).

The only weak link here is Bannon’s lyrics, which tend toward the maudlin and over-conceptual: “I am that aimless arrow, lost from the very start / Violence without purpose, born of broken hearts.” Then, of course, there’s the cloyingly reductive album title (though it does earn points for antagonizing U2). But you’ll forget all about that by the time you get to the noisy, screechy “Empty on the Inside,” which seems to incorporate all those aforementioned touchstones at once — bluesy fills, feedback, a driving bass line from Nate Newton, soaring guitars, militaristic drums — to create the album’s most unsettling, hypnotic moment.

That Converge can dabble in so many styles and still inherently come out sounding like themselves is what makes All We Love work. And besides, there are enough tortured screams and catastrophic riffs strewn about this LP’s 38 minutes to carry fans another three years, until the boys conceive their next multicolored, limited-edition musical apocalypse. Maybe that’s all the personality they need.

ALBUM REVIEW: ARCHITECTS “LOST FOREVER // LOST TOGETHER” 
Fuck ‘Daybreaker’. Fuck ‘The Here And Now’. Fuck ‘Nighmares’. Fuck ‘Ruin’, and fuck ‘Hollow Crown' too! Even though each of Architects' previous five albums are all great releases, they pale in comparison to what the band has achieved on album number six, which goes beyond anything they have done before. But before this review tells you why you need this album in your life, let's try not to get too ahead of ourselves.
Since the start of this year, the four boys from across the pond have been teasing and exciting us all with their new singles 'Naysayer’, ‘Broken Cross’, and just recently with ‘C.A.N.C.E.R’. Each of these songs set YouTube, Facebook and most of the band’s social media platforms alight with eager anticipation and praise from fans and peers alike. There was always skepticism though, as Architects have a great ear for choosing the right songs to release first, but once the album is out, some songs are skimmed over as mere filler. However, that’s not the case with ‘Lost Forever//Lost Together’.
When you listen to each track individually you will see something really special, something much more refined in the writing. This is probably one of those things that comes with time and experience, but it’s such a welcomed feeling to have every track as a favourite now. There isn’t any kind of filler on here. Every track feels like a beast in its own right, and the non-single tracks aren’t tossed aside by the ones that are (which is exactly what happened with 09’s ‘Hollow Crown’). As there aren’t any acoustic or full-on melodic tracks on ‘Lost Forever//Lost Together' ('Heartburn’, ‘Open Letter To Myself’, ‘Behind The Throne' or 'Hollow Crown' anyone?), everything feels more tight, more cohesive and just so much more refined. Not only that, but as a whole, this is the most consistent album in the bands discography. And now, to the album!
Kicking this glorious forty minute plus listen is the vicious 'Gravedigger’, which strikes hard and fast. The eerie, clean guitar chords at the start erupt into the galloping first verse, which is probably one of the fast intros in the band’s career, right before pure chaos explodes in the breakdowns and chorus . The group’s brand of technical, but not quite minding bending, aggressive metalcore approach to 'Gravedigger' follows all the way through the rest of the album, yet each track feels slightly different from the last. From the way the atmospheric mid-album instrumental 'Red Hypergiant' transitions into the powerfully heavy and almost djent sounding 'C.A.N.C.E.R’; to how the aggressive, defiant and motivated anthem that is ’Naysayer' moves into the absolutely crushing and monolithic soundscapes of 'Broken Cross' (Which is basically 'Alpha Omega Pt.2').
Seriously, this album is just pure musical gold.
‘The Devil Is Near' and 'The Youth Is Wasted On The Young' (which is where the full-length's title comes from and also features guest vocals Murray Macleod from Scottish band, The Xcerts) are, much like the opening track, some seriously fast and powerful tunes. They rip through your ears in a non-conscious manner and the latter will have you singing along in no time flat. These two will be sure to open up mosh pits in milliseconds. ‘Colony Collapse' and the album closer, 'The Distant Blue' - which is probably the heaviest song on the album - both have such an anthemic sound, filled with odious lyrics towards our species and how we treat the planet we inhabit. Although, that theme does seem a little obvious considering the album's title, but it is FAR better than having those cliché ex-friend/ex-lover, life on the road, ‘look at us now’ kind of lyrics that plague most other bands in their genre.
New and old fans alike will fall in love with this record. It embodies the best parts of Architects and their sound. Sam Carter's powerful screams, melodic singing and universally themed lyrics (all of which seems to get better with every new album); Tom Searle's riffs, chuggs, leads are all super tight and heavy; Dan Searle's top notch drumming is just excellent, and it puts most other hardore/metal drummers to shame; and Alex Dean's, rumbling bass parts that under pin each groove and breakdown so damn well. It's all there!
In fact, it’s not just the music that is exceptional, but the mixing of this album is also one of a very high quality. Producers and engineers Fredrik Nordström and Heinrik Udd (Bring Me The Horizon, Buried In Verona, Soilwork, I Killed The Prom Queen, At The Gates). have done a fantastic job of helping the band capture their best work in the best sounding fashion. It’s easy to see why a lot bands go with those two guys for taking the reins of production/engineering duties.
Even though It’s early days for 2014, ’Lost Forever//Lost Together’ has all of the definite potential to be one of the best albums of the year. This is going to be the year of Architects. Just you watch.
CONCLUSION.
Architects have finally released their magnum opus with album number six. It’s a career standout if there ever was one. ‘Lost Forever//Lost Together’ is a master class not just for the band’s genre, but for heavy music in general. It may not revolutionise the global musical landscape in the most radical way, but it’s an album that has been so perfectly written, mixed and executed that many groups will be kicking themselves for not having this monster under their belts. At the end of this year, many will look back and say without a doubt that this was one of the best records of 2014.
TRACKLISTING.
GravediggerNaysayerBroken CrossThe Devil Is NearDead Man TalkingRed Hypergiant C.A.N.C.E.R.Colony CollapseCastles In The AirThe Youth is Wasted on the YoungThe Distant Blue

ALBUM REVIEW: ARCHITECTS “LOST FOREVER // LOST TOGETHER” 

Fuck ‘Daybreaker’. Fuck ‘The Here And Now’. Fuck ‘Nighmares’. Fuck ‘Ruin’, and fuck ‘Hollow Crown' too! Even though each of Architects' previous five albums are all great releases, they pale in comparison to what the band has achieved on album number six, which goes beyond anything they have done before. But before this review tells you why you need this album in your life, let's try not to get too ahead of ourselves.

Since the start of this year, the four boys from across the pond have been teasing and exciting us all with their new singles 'Naysayer’, ‘Broken Cross’, and just recently with ‘C.A.N.C.E.R’. Each of these songs set YouTube, Facebook and most of the band’s social media platforms alight with eager anticipation and praise from fans and peers alike. There was always skepticism though, as Architects have a great ear for choosing the right songs to release first, but once the album is out, some songs are skimmed over as mere filler. However, that’s not the case with ‘Lost Forever//Lost Together’.

When you listen to each track individually you will see something really special, something much more refined in the writing. This is probably one of those things that comes with time and experience, but it’s such a welcomed feeling to have every track as a favourite now. There isn’t any kind of filler on here. Every track feels like a beast in its own right, and the non-single tracks aren’t tossed aside by the ones that are (which is exactly what happened with 09’s ‘Hollow Crown’). As there aren’t any acoustic or full-on melodic tracks on ‘Lost Forever//Lost Together' ('Heartburn’, ‘Open Letter To Myself’, ‘Behind The Throne' or 'Hollow Crown' anyone?), everything feels more tight, more cohesive and just so much more refined. Not only that, but as a whole, this is the most consistent album in the bands discography. And now, to the album!

Kicking this glorious forty minute plus listen is the vicious 'Gravedigger’, which strikes hard and fast. The eerie, clean guitar chords at the start erupt into the galloping first verse, which is probably one of the fast intros in the band’s career, right before pure chaos explodes in the breakdowns and chorus . The group’s brand of technical, but not quite minding bending, aggressive metalcore approach to 'Gravedigger' follows all the way through the rest of the album, yet each track feels slightly different from the last. From the way the atmospheric mid-album instrumental 'Red Hypergiant' transitions into the powerfully heavy and almost djent sounding 'C.A.N.C.E.R’; to how the aggressivedefiant and motivated anthem that is Naysayer' moves into the absolutely crushing and monolithic soundscapes of 'Broken Cross' (Which is basically 'Alpha Omega Pt.2').

Seriously, this album is just pure musical gold.

The Devil Is Near' and 'The Youth Is Wasted On The Young' (which is where the full-length's title comes from and also features guest vocals Murray Macleod from Scottish band, The Xcerts) are, much like the opening track, some seriously fast and powerful tunes. They rip through your ears in a non-conscious manner and the latter will have you singing along in no time flat. These two will be sure to open up mosh pits in milliseconds. ‘Colony Collapse' and the album closer, 'The Distant Blue' - which is probably the heaviest song on the album - both have such an anthemic sound, filled with odious lyrics towards our species and how we treat the planet we inhabit. Although, that theme does seem a little obvious considering the album's title, but it is FAR better than having those cliché ex-friend/ex-lover, life on the road, ‘look at us now’ kind of lyrics that plague most other bands in their genre.

New and old fans alike will fall in love with this record. It embodies the best parts of Architects and their sound. Sam Carter's powerful screams, melodic singing and universally themed lyrics (all of which seems to get better with every new album); Tom Searle's riffs, chuggs, leads are all super tight and heavy; Dan Searle's top notch drumming is just excellent, and it puts most other hardore/metal drummers to shame; and Alex Dean's, rumbling bass parts that under pin each groove and breakdown so damn well. It's all there!

In fact, it’s not just the music that is exceptional, but the mixing of this album is also one of a very high quality. Producers and engineers Fredrik Nordström and Heinrik Udd (Bring Me The HorizonBuried In VeronaSoilworkI Killed The Prom Queen, At The Gates). have done a fantastic job of helping the band capture their best work in the best sounding fashion. It’s easy to see why a lot bands go with those two guys for taking the reins of production/engineering duties.

Even though It’s early days for 2014, ’Lost Forever//Lost Together has all of the definite potential to be one of the best albums of the year. This is going to be the year of Architects. Just you watch.

CONCLUSION.

Architects have finally released their magnum opus with album number six. It’s a career standout if there ever was one. ‘Lost Forever//Lost Together’ is a master class not just for the band’s genre, but for heavy music in general. It may not revolutionise the global musical landscape in the most radical way, but it’s an album that has been so perfectly written, mixed and executed that many groups will be kicking themselves for not having this monster under their belts. At the end of this year, many will look back and say without a doubt that this was one of the best records of 2014.

TRACKLISTING.

Gravedigger
Naysayer
Broken Cross
The Devil Is Near
Dead Man Talking
Red Hypergiant 
C.A.N.C.E.R.
Colony Collapse
Castles In The Air
The Youth is Wasted on the Young
The Distant Blue

Lana Del Rey's Ultraviolence project may still be a few weeks away from its official drop, but to hold fans over the songstress has released a brand new single off the project titled “Shades Of Cool.” Alongside the release of the new single, Miss Del Rey has also activated the pre-order link for her highly anticipated project, so head here to get ahead of the game and hit play below to peep “Shades Of Cool.”

Lana Del Rey's Ultraviolence project may still be a few weeks away from its official drop, but to hold fans over the songstress has released a brand new single off the project titled “Shades Of Cool.” Alongside the release of the new single, Miss Del Rey has also activated the pre-order link for her highly anticipated project, so head here to get ahead of the game and hit play below to peep “Shades Of Cool.”

Goldfinger Presents:

Mixtape Vol. 5 “GOLDWANG”

Download Here