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Pure Noise must be excited with what their bands are doing these days. ” Life Lessons”, the latest release from Harrisburg’s Handguns is a pop punk bullseye. With tons of music to choose from, especially in this genre, picking a start to a new highly anticipated album is crucial. It really has to create a spark, to shape and form the album, similar to, dare I say, an anvil.
The first track off the new record is a quick shot from the hip. Fast, loud, and short. “Anvil” weighing in at 1 minute and 22 seconds picks up where the band left off. We were patiently waiting for the new release, and judging from the first track, we won’t be let down. 
Reloading for the next blast of a song, “Sleep Deprived” keeps Handguns’ going. Fast poppy, and riddled with muted crunching guitars and head nodding drum beats, this song guides us smoothly along to a scream a long pop punk type of breakdown that seemed to dissipate over the years. Way to bring it back boys. With these first two tracks as evidence, Handgun’s hasn’t strayed to far from what they know. What they’ve learned.  And what we love. 
Next in the chamber  “Highway Robbery” holds us up for another pin point accurate pop punk heavy hitter. With lyrics that will surely be shouted by fans across the US, everyone will feel at home and not like they’re wasting away. Fast, in your face, and abruptly ending to make for the perfect get away into one of the more catchy songs on the album. 
Starting off like the first three ” Heart vs. Head” is just on par with how the album is going. Fast guitar and drums we’re almost expecting what will happen. But Handgun’s has a refreshing reload for a moment, breaking out the slowed down sing song chorus. Repeating this fast to slow formula, the Harrisburg five show what they have composition wise with a belted symphonic pop punk “breakdown”. With a swinging baseline to lead us into an open chorded serenade to finish up track four. 
One that we can probably all relate to, as pop punk fans, is ironically titled “I Can’t Relate”. Topics such as happiness, student loans, societies views and living lives for ourselves, are all covered in this shorty but goody. Guaranteed to be a crowd pleaser and dog-pile maker. Don’t lie, you can’t wait to scream ” NO I DON’T, NO I DON’T, NO I!”
Properly living up to the album name “The Loved Ones Who Hate Us” covers exactly that. Wondering if anyone still cares and trying to balance family and friend relationships, Taylor Eby (vocals) carefully orchestrates a call and answer type chorus. With a guest appearance by Soupy of The Wonder Years, the first single off ” Life Lessons” (check out the video if you haven’t, pretty funny) somewhat shifts the gears into a more personal direction the record seems to take from here. 
Bringing in the more spacey and technicality Handguns’ has to offer, “Queens” illustrates the fearlessness the band holds. Upbeat and moving, this one touches on a more physical aspect of life lessons. Getting punched in the face is never fun, but sometimes, a life lesson that needs to be had. 
It’s unclear if there is an unwritten rule in the pop punk handbook, but songs about looking into the past are always the slow jams of the record. Definitely true with “Give and Take”. Not the slowest song you’ll hear by any means, this reminiscent jam is still the slower guy of the album. Catchy and fun, “Give and Take” is a great breather from what Handguns’ has shot off so far.
Touching on the tender subject of losing a loved one is “Waiting For Your Ghost”. With a fun poppy sound, it’s easy to miss the subject matter being belted out. While it may be a tough one to play live, this is without a doubt going to get kids off their feet.
The closing track shows that something was learned from all these life lessons. “New Years Resolution” covers how the world is a testing world and backing down and not putting up a fight is no option. Keeping the “in your face” styled song going strong, “New Years Resolution” is a solid ending choice for the album. Fast verses, heavy hitting choruses, climactic build ups, and vocal driven quotes of positivity. “Life Lessons” has everything wanted in a pop punk album, and is proof that Handguns’ learned this lesson and learned it fast. 

Pure Noise must be excited with what their bands are doing these days. ” Life Lessons”, the latest release from Harrisburg’s Handguns is a pop punk bullseye. With tons of music to choose from, especially in this genre, picking a start to a new highly anticipated album is crucial. It really has to create a spark, to shape and form the album, similar to, dare I say, an anvil.

The first track off the new record is a quick shot from the hip. Fast, loud, and short. “Anvil” weighing in at 1 minute and 22 seconds picks up where the band left off. We were patiently waiting for the new release, and judging from the first track, we won’t be let down. 

Reloading for the next blast of a song, “Sleep Deprived” keeps Handguns’ going. Fast poppy, and riddled with muted crunching guitars and head nodding drum beats, this song guides us smoothly along to a scream a long pop punk type of breakdown that seemed to dissipate over the years. Way to bring it back boys. With these first two tracks as evidence, Handgun’s hasn’t strayed to far from what they know. What they’ve learned.  And what we love. 

Next in the chamber  “Highway Robbery” holds us up for another pin point accurate pop punk heavy hitter. With lyrics that will surely be shouted by fans across the US, everyone will feel at home and not like they’re wasting away. Fast, in your face, and abruptly ending to make for the perfect get away into one of the more catchy songs on the album. 

Starting off like the first three ” Heart vs. Head” is just on par with how the album is going. Fast guitar and drums we’re almost expecting what will happen. But Handgun’s has a refreshing reload for a moment, breaking out the slowed down sing song chorus. Repeating this fast to slow formula, the Harrisburg five show what they have composition wise with a belted symphonic pop punk “breakdown”. With a swinging baseline to lead us into an open chorded serenade to finish up track four. 

One that we can probably all relate to, as pop punk fans, is ironically titled “I Can’t Relate”. Topics such as happiness, student loans, societies views and living lives for ourselves, are all covered in this shorty but goody. Guaranteed to be a crowd pleaser and dog-pile maker. Don’t lie, you can’t wait to scream ” NO I DON’T, NO I DON’T, NO I!”

Properly living up to the album name “The Loved Ones Who Hate Us” covers exactly that. Wondering if anyone still cares and trying to balance family and friend relationships, Taylor Eby (vocals) carefully orchestrates a call and answer type chorus. With a guest appearance by Soupy of The Wonder Years, the first single off ” Life Lessons” (check out the video if you haven’t, pretty funny) somewhat shifts the gears into a more personal direction the record seems to take from here. 

Bringing in the more spacey and technicality Handguns’ has to offer, “Queens” illustrates the fearlessness the band holds. Upbeat and moving, this one touches on a more physical aspect of life lessons. Getting punched in the face is never fun, but sometimes, a life lesson that needs to be had. 

It’s unclear if there is an unwritten rule in the pop punk handbook, but songs about looking into the past are always the slow jams of the record. Definitely true with “Give and Take”. Not the slowest song you’ll hear by any means, this reminiscent jam is still the slower guy of the album. Catchy and fun, “Give and Take” is a great breather from what Handguns’ has shot off so far.

Touching on the tender subject of losing a loved one is “Waiting For Your Ghost”. With a fun poppy sound, it’s easy to miss the subject matter being belted out. While it may be a tough one to play live, this is without a doubt going to get kids off their feet.

The closing track shows that something was learned from all these life lessons. “New Years Resolution” covers how the world is a testing world and backing down and not putting up a fight is no option. Keeping the “in your face” styled song going strong, “New Years Resolution” is a solid ending choice for the album. Fast verses, heavy hitting choruses, climactic build ups, and vocal driven quotes of positivity. “Life Lessons” has everything wanted in a pop punk album, and is proof that Handguns’ learned this lesson and learned it fast. 

Goldfinger X Wasted Mind: The Backyard Loving Tape

Here is selected songs by me and my bud at 01:12 AM. sounds would telling you the thing everyone know about play/download then leave a comment below, have been fallin’ love huh?

- WM

Song List:
01. Mayer Hawthorne - Just Ain’t Gonna Work Out
02. Gorillaz - To Binge
03. Jamie Aditya Graham - Now You’re Gone
04. Craft Spells - After The Moment
05. Flim - Stuck Inside My Head
06. The West Coast Pop Experimental - I Won’t Hurt You
07. Beach Fossils - Daydream
08. Alex Turner - Piledriver Waltz
09. She & Him - Why Do You Let Me Stay Here?
10. Indische Party - Hey Girl
11. Wild Nothing - Live In Dream
12. Renee Olstead - Stars Fell On Alabama
13. Belle & Sebastian - Dress Up In You
14. Bloc Party - This Modern Love
15. The Jesus And Mary Chain - Just Like Honey
16. White Shoes And The Couple Company - Cerita Cita

Watch the Official “Collapse” Gameplay Video for ‘Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare’

Not only did Call of Duty unveil multiplayer action from the upcoming Advanced Warfare game this week at Gamescom, Sledgehammer also showcased another video entitled “Collapse” featuring action from the campaign mode. Call of Duty campaign modes are always a blast and this one appears to be no exception to that. Check out the high speed chase and standoff that takes place on San Francisco’s Golden Gate bridge!

Paris Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2014 Street Style Report.

Currently mix by our Hang Boy @thewastedmind. He says this is the first tape he dedicated to everyone where it was in sadness situation. can be describe by broken bones into million pieces, you’ll feel it.

Tracklist:
1. Counterparts - The Disconnect
2. Touche Amore - Face Ghost
3. ALICE - In The Names of Forvigeness, I’ll Be Leaving This Secret With You  
4. Forever//Always - Sea of Repeat
5. Echolight - Maturity After Depression
6. Being As An Ocean - Mediocre Shakespeare
7. Defeater - No Saviour
8. Alive - Somewhere Behind The Door
9. Landscapes - Epilogy
10. Driven Fear - Hope
11. A Thousand Punches - Ballads of The Faith
12. Northlane - Discoveries

GAME REVIEW: The Amazing Spider-Man 2

feels like what would happen if you found a cursed monkey’s paw and wished for the best web-slinging experience ever. For all the fun you can have swinging around New York City, it’s canceled out by boring Peter Parker segments, frustratingly dull combat, and annoyingly persistent glitches. Meanwhile, plot is tossed aside in favor of churning out an unsatisfying parade of supervillains.
 

 
Traversal is much-improved from 2012’s Amazing Spider-Man game. Your web lines have to actually attach to a nearby building or structure, so you’re encouraged to swing close to the ground where taxis and other vehicles honk as you narrowly miss them. It’s much more fun than flying high above them on webs apparently attached to clouds. Having the left and right triggers (or mouse buttons) mapped to swinging with their respective arms is a nice addition, too; the ability to alternate adds a tad more authenticity to Spidey’s wild and fast swinging, as does cutting around a corner by using the inside arm. The first time I made a crazy dive from a skyscraper and attached a web to a building right before hitting the ground, I could finally relate to the common scene that’s played out in just about every Spider-Man movie over the last dozen years. I never wanted to stop moving in The Amazing Spider-Man 2.
 
Adding to that feeling is that things aren’t much fun once you slow down. Like the last movie tie-in, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 attempts to be Arkham-lite when it comes to combat, and fails due to its repetitive nature. While Spidey’s range for stealth attacks has been increased, that benefit is negated by the guesswork involved in discovering said range, since there is no indicator like in The Amazing Spider-Man.
 
When you’re inevitably discovered, there’s usually not much to winning fights: just button-mash the attack button until your Spidey-sense tingles, then dodge or counter. If you need to slow an enemy down, spam them with webbing. It lacks the options that make Batman’s combat interesting.
 
The sub-par enemy AI comes to light whenever you Web Dash just a few feet away from a thug. That’ll often confound lesser foes, even the ones that accompany bosses. When enemies aren’t easily confused, they’re straight-up broken; you can expect multiple occurrences of thugs walking into walls or bosses that glitch into game-breaking states. This either renders them completely open to attack or indefinitely invincible, requiring a restart.
 
Missions in The Amazing Spider-Man 2 are significantly shorter than its predecessor’s, but the running time is roughly the same seven hours due to undesirable padding. The combat lead-up to a boss battle is actually pretty short – more often than not, you have to clear a single (albeit large) room of enemies before progressing to the supervillan. It takes about 15 minutes to beat one, but you’ll have spent another 15 during that mission slowly walking around taking photos and searching for items as Peter Parker. The biggest affront in this added time is the “interactive” dialogue sequences. These are consequence-free choices that just determine the order in which questions are asked.
 
GAME REVIEW: The Amazing Spider-Man 2
feels like what would happen if you found a cursed monkey’s paw and wished for the best web-slinging experience ever. For all the fun you can have swinging around New York City, it’s canceled out by boring Peter Parker segments, frustratingly dull combat, and annoyingly persistent glitches. Meanwhile, plot is tossed aside in favor of churning out an unsatisfying parade of supervillains.
 
 
Traversal is much-improved from 2012’s Amazing Spider-Man game. Your web lines have to actually attach to a nearby building or structure, so you’re encouraged to swing close to the ground where taxis and other vehicles honk as you narrowly miss them. It’s much more fun than flying high above them on webs apparently attached to clouds. Having the left and right triggers (or mouse buttons) mapped to swinging with their respective arms is a nice addition, too; the ability to alternate adds a tad more authenticity to Spidey’s wild and fast swinging, as does cutting around a corner by using the inside arm. The first time I made a crazy dive from a skyscraper and attached a web to a building right before hitting the ground, I could finally relate to the common scene that’s played out in just about every Spider-Man movie over the last dozen years. I never wanted to stop moving in The Amazing Spider-Man 2.
 
Adding to that feeling is that things aren’t much fun once you slow down. Like the last movie tie-in, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 attempts to be Arkham-lite when it comes to combat, and fails due to its repetitive nature. While Spidey’s range for stealth attacks has been increased, that benefit is negated by the guesswork involved in discovering said range, since there is no indicator like in The Amazing Spider-Man.
 
When you’re inevitably discovered, there’s usually not much to winning fights: just button-mash the attack button until your Spidey-sense tingles, then dodge or counter. If you need to slow an enemy down, spam them with webbing. It lacks the options that make Batman’s combat interesting.
 
The sub-par enemy AI comes to light whenever you Web Dash just a few feet away from a thug. That’ll often confound lesser foes, even the ones that accompany bosses. When enemies aren’t easily confused, they’re straight-up broken; you can expect multiple occurrences of thugs walking into walls or bosses that glitch into game-breaking states. This either renders them completely open to attack or indefinitely invincible, requiring a restart.
 
Missions in The Amazing Spider-Man 2 are significantly shorter than its predecessor’s, but the running time is roughly the same seven hours due to undesirable padding. The combat lead-up to a boss battle is actually pretty short – more often than not, you have to clear a single (albeit large) room of enemies before progressing to the supervillan. It takes about 15 minutes to beat one, but you’ll have spent another 15 during that mission slowly walking around taking photos and searching for items as Peter Parker. The biggest affront in this added time is the “interactive” dialogue sequences. These are consequence-free choices that just determine the order in which questions are asked.
 

Here it is, the much anticipated and haunting new video for the title track fromLana Del Rey's smash LPUltraviolence. You’ll find innocent ole’ Lana frolicking around with her beau on what appears to be her wedding day. The whole video was shot on VHS too. The single meanwhile can be found on Lana’s latest album out now via Interscope/Polydor. Press play above and leave comments below, enjoy.

Joyce Manor’s ‘Never Hungover Again’ Will Engross Us All

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July 14, 2014
by Bryne Yancey

Maybe alienation is a strong word, but some Joyce Manor fans probably felt alienated by 2012’sOf All Things I Will Soon Grow Tired. A nine-track, 13-minute flurry of non-repeating moods and ideas, of quietly distant acoustic guitars, Smiths-laced pop-rock, and an aggressive cover of the Buggles’ “Video Killed The Radio Star,” the album seemed to be an overt reaction to the fan-friendly, poppy straightforwardness of the band’s 2011 eponymous debut. It was a studio-heavy project full of songs that wouldn’t, and didn’t, easily translate to the band’s live shows. An experiment, even. Critics loved it; fans were a little less universally enthusiastic. “Violent Inside” and “Comfortable Clothes” weren’t getting the same reaction live as “Constant Headache,” “Beach Community” or any other song from Joyce Manor.

The thing about a band completely subverting expectations, especially when following up such a beloved debut, is that it becomes a pattern if it’s done for more than one album, and with that comes a lot of risk. Subvert expectations once, and the fans will stick around; do it twice or more, and the band risks garnering a reputation they may not want. Fans are smarter than ever now, and they pick up on that stuff. While its members aren’t rich by any conceivable stretch, Joyce Manor make the bulk of their money as a band while touring. In a weird way, they’ve kind of set themselves up to only write and perform “hits” for the immediate future. A revelation of a first record will do that to a band sometimes.

Never Hungover Again, out July 22 on Epitaph and streaming at NPR right now, seems primed to reconcile and reinvigorate those aforementioned alienated sections of Joyce Manor’s fervent, stagedive-happy fanbase. It’s apparent that the band wanted to write a record that would one hundred percent translate to the stage. At ten songs and 19 minutes, it’s crisply presented and eternally replayable. (Well-intentioned listeners wishing aloud that the band would write longer songs and longer records: Why? Your own conventions of what a song should or shouldn’t be cannot be imposed on a band unless perhaps you are in that band. It reeks of entitlement. If a song, whether it’s a minute long or 20 minutes long, represents a fully-formed artistic idea, then why does its length matter? The world, and even punk rock, has more 3:30 songs than we’ll ever need, and a lot of them could be just as effective if shortened. The age-old “always leave them wanting more” mantra applies here, too.)

The album is also profoundly sad. Barry Johnson, sounding more vocally confident than he ever has, hits every note with seeming ease, a stark contrast to Joyce Manor’s earlier work when he was more monotone or reaching depending on the song. Lyrically, there’s a lot of uncertainty. Though he sounds assured (if not an octave higher, like on “Christmas Card”), Johnson is portraying distinct vulnerability and varying degrees of self-loathing in his words certain to evoke those types of feelings we don’t often share out loud with other people, and struggle to even acknowledge within our own heads. “Falling in Love Again” in particular evokes this sort of worldview.

And, though the songs are fairly straightforward in tempo and composition, they also exhibit a lot of growth, showing that the Joyce Manor’s desire to experiment and subvert expectations has just moved inward, rather than completely dying. The keys that elevate “Falling in Love Again,” the noodly guitar riffs that surround “End of the Summer,” the tightly-wound power-pop of “Victoria,” the omnipresent jangle of “Heated Swimming Pool,” and other moments really giveNever Hungover Again a personality atypical of a punk record, one that’s moody without ever being overly brooding and, given its brevity, doesn’t leave enough time for that anyway.

Life is pretty simple: You do some stuff. Most fails. Some works. You do more of what works. If it works big, others quickly copy it. Then you do something else. The trick is the doing something else. - Leonardo da Vinci