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Goldfinger® // Sticker Slap Vol.1

Here is Magenta, Essentials, Outstanding Wall Tagging by Dobznine

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NO HEROES: WHY WE NEED TO STOP PUTTING PUNKS ON A PEDESTAL
Most punk fans have their own Mount Rushmore, whether they’ve spoken aloud about it to others or not. The same could probably be said for fans of rock ‘n roll, hip-hop, heavy metal, blues, and country music. (This brand of reverence is not something that generally happens in pop music though, because pop music is inherently disposable.) If you haven’t done so already, take a few seconds to think about who’s on your punk Mount Rushmore right now. Joe Strummer, Ian Mackaye, Keith Morris, Milo Aukerman, Joey Ramone, H.R., Jello Biafra, Greg Graffin, Jesse Michaels, Exene Cervenka, Ben Weasel or Henry Rollins might come to mind, among others. Or, you could go newish school and narrow Blake Schwarzenbach, Brendan Kelly, Dan Yemin, Jason Shevchuk, Chuck Ragan, Paddy Costello, Matt Skiba and Brian Fallon down to a foursome. You also could go cross-generational. You can pick anyone you want, is the point. It’s your Rushmore. Unlike those other genres of music, it’s often very difficult, or perhaps impossible, for punk fans to separate the art of those on their Mount Rushmore from the artists themselves. Because punk is so inherently personal and its artists on such an even level with the audience, the artists’ extracurricular exploits often color the audience’s opinion of their art, whether or not the connection between the two is apparent. If your hero turns out to be a different person than you thought they were, it can taint all of your past experiences with them and simply cancel any future experiences. And, though I’m sure he couldn’t possibly care less, Henry Rollins complicated the feelings of a lot of fans yesterday with his LA Weekly column. Titled Fuck Suicide, Rollins focuses on the suicide of Robin Williams and the nationwide mourning that ensued in the days following the beloved actor’s death. At first, he’s very complimentary of Williams’ talents and impact on our culture, but then the column takes a weird turn into a problematic manifesto that dumbs down severe depression into some kind of tone-deaf boilerplate language:

But I simply cannot understand how any parent could kill themselves. How in the hell could you possibly do that to your children? I don’t care how well adjusted your kid might be — choosing to kill yourself, rather than to be there for that child, is every shade of awful, traumatic and confusing. I think as soon as you have children, you waive your right to take your own life. No matter what mistakes you make in life, it should be your utmost goal not to traumatize your kids. So, you don’t kill yourself … When someone negates their existence, they cancel themselves out in my mind. I have many records, books and films featuring people who have taken their own lives, and I regard them all with a bit of disdain. When someone commits this act, he or she is out of my analog world. I know they existed, yet they have nullified their existence because they willfully removed themselves from life. They were real but now they are not. I no longer take this person seriously. I may be able to appreciate what he or she did artistically but it’s impossible to feel bad for them. Their life wasn’t cut short — it was purposely abandoned. It’s hard to feel bad when the person did what they wanted to. It sucks they are gone, of course, but it’s the decision they made. I have to respect it and move on.

The above is the worst fears of someone suffering from depression wholly materialized. It validates their feelings of dread, of unnecessity, of their depression or suicide being of total inconsequence to those around them. These words from Rollins aren’t just grossly generalized and misinformed, they’re callous and downright dangerous. What’s more disheartening is that Rollins notes in the column that he’s lived with and befriended depressed people, yet his ability to experience empathy for them appears to be non-existent. For some fans of his artistic exploits, this will be a dealbreaker. Those Black Flag records, the four bars tattoos, the WWHRD? t-shirts, all that stuff may be tainted now. But should it be? Rollins’ stance on this particular topic is undoubtedly idiotic, but are we as fans being too naive by accepting our punk heroes as infallible human beings with perfect opinions on absolutely everything? It’s a difficult and intensely personal question to answer. Maybe there are no heroes here. Heroes are, by definition, noble people with few if any flaws; punk rock, by historical definition, tends to attract weird, flawed, unsure, outcasted people to its ranks as a safe place to be themselves, exchange ideas, rail against the establishment and generally cause a ruckus. I won’t defend Rollins for throwing so much obliviously mean-spirited shade at depression, or Ben Weasel for hitting women, or Exene Cervenka for believing that the horrific UC Santa Barbara massacre was a hoax. Their words and actions are indefensible. But knowing full well the type of flawed person who gravitates toward punk, what exactly should we have expected? Damaged, My Brain Hurts and Los Angeles are still some of the best, most important punk records ever. Maybe they’re better served as historical documents separated from their artists’ personal psyches. Maybe the artists’ personal psyches, good or bad, need to be taken into account in order to give their work proper context. Ultimately, it’s up to the listener to decide for themselves whether or not they can continue to enjoy the music. That’s the great thing about music: There’s no right or wrong answer, no objective truths. Interpretation and implementation is up to you, but perhaps it’s time we hurl wrecking balls into our Mount Rushmores and resist the urge to rebuild.

NO HEROES: WHY WE NEED TO STOP PUTTING PUNKS ON A PEDESTAL

Most punk fans have their own Mount Rushmore, whether they’ve spoken aloud about it to others or not. The same could probably be said for fans of rock ‘n roll, hip-hop, heavy metal, blues, and country music. (This brand of reverence is not something that generally happens in pop music though, because pop music is inherently disposable.) If you haven’t done so already, take a few seconds to think about who’s on your punk Mount Rushmore right now. Joe Strummer, Ian Mackaye, Keith Morris, Milo Aukerman, Joey Ramone, H.R., Jello Biafra, Greg Graffin, Jesse Michaels, Exene Cervenka, Ben Weasel or Henry Rollins might come to mind, among others. Or, you could go newish school and narrow Blake Schwarzenbach, Brendan Kelly, Dan Yemin, Jason Shevchuk, Chuck Ragan, Paddy Costello, Matt Skiba and Brian Fallon down to a foursome. You also could go cross-generational. You can pick anyone you want, is the point. It’s your Rushmore. 

Unlike those other genres of music, it’s often very difficult, or perhaps impossible, for punk fans to separate the art of those on their Mount Rushmore from the artists themselves. Because punk is so inherently personal and its artists on such an even level with the audience, the artists’ extracurricular exploits often color the audience’s opinion of their art, whether or not the connection between the two is apparent. If your hero turns out to be a different person than you thought they were, it can taint all of your past experiences with them and simply cancel any future experiences. 

And, though I’m sure he couldn’t possibly care less, Henry Rollins complicated the feelings of a lot of fans yesterday with his LA Weekly column. Titled Fuck Suicide, Rollins focuses on the suicide of Robin Williams and the nationwide mourning that ensued in the days following the beloved actor’s death. At first, he’s very complimentary of Williams’ talents and impact on our culture, but then the column takes a weird turn into a problematic manifesto that dumbs down severe depression into some kind of tone-deaf boilerplate language:

But I simply cannot understand how any parent could kill themselves. 

How in the hell could you possibly do that to your children? I don’t care how well adjusted your kid might be — choosing to kill yourself, rather than to be there for that child, is every shade of awful, traumatic and confusing. I think as soon as you have children, you waive your right to take your own life. No matter what mistakes you make in life, it should be your utmost goal not to traumatize your kids. So, you don’t kill yourself … When someone negates their existence, they cancel themselves out in my mind. I have many records, books and films featuring people who have taken their own lives, and I regard them all with a bit of disdain. When someone commits this act, he or she is out of my analog world. I know they existed, yet they have nullified their existence because they willfully removed themselves from life. They were real but now they are not. 

I no longer take this person seriously. I may be able to appreciate what he or she did artistically but it’s impossible to feel bad for them. Their life wasn’t cut short — it was purposely abandoned. It’s hard to feel bad when the person did what they wanted to. It sucks they are gone, of course, but it’s the decision they made. I have to respect it and move on.

The above is the worst fears of someone suffering from depression wholly materialized. It validates their feelings of dread, of unnecessity, of their depression or suicide being of total inconsequence to those around them. These words from Rollins aren’t just grossly generalized and misinformed, they’re callous and downright dangerous. 

What’s more disheartening is that Rollins notes in the column that he’s lived with and befriended depressed people, yet his ability to experience empathy for them appears to be non-existent. For some fans of his artistic exploits, this will be a dealbreaker. Those Black Flag records, the four bars tattoos, the WWHRD? t-shirts, all that stuff may be tainted now. But should it be? Rollins’ stance on this particular topic is undoubtedly idiotic, but are we as fans being too naive by accepting our punk heroes as infallible human beings with perfect opinions on absolutely everything? It’s a difficult and intensely personal question to answer. 

Maybe there are no heroes here. Heroes are, by definition, noble people with few if any flaws; punk rock, by historical definition, tends to attract weird, flawed, unsure, outcasted people to its ranks as a safe place to be themselves, exchange ideas, rail against the establishment and generally cause a ruckus. I won’t defend Rollins for throwing so much obliviously mean-spirited shade at depression, or Ben Weasel for hitting women, or Exene Cervenka for believing that the horrific UC Santa Barbara massacre was a hoax. Their words and actions are indefensible. But knowing full well the type of flawed person who gravitates toward punk, what exactly should we have expected? 

DamagedMy Brain Hurts and Los Angeles are still some of the best, most important punk records ever. Maybe they’re better served as historical documents separated from their artists’ personal psyches. Maybe the artists’ personal psyches, good or bad, need to be taken into account in order to give their work proper context. Ultimately, it’s up to the listener to decide for themselves whether or not they can continue to enjoy the music. That’s the great thing about music: There’s no right or wrong answer, no objective truths. Interpretation and implementation is up to you, but perhaps it’s time we hurl wrecking balls into our Mount Rushmores and resist the urge to rebuild.

Wasted Mind: Death of A Living Mankind
unless you devote your life to following his teachings you will suffer a firey torture in Hell.

Songlist:
01. Everytime I Die - After One Quarter of A Reveolution
02. For The Flames Beneath Your Bridge - Avaritia
03. Trap Them - Every Walk A Quarantine
04. Deadly Eye Candy - Bernice Worden Vs. 22 Caliber Riffle
05. Cursed - Polygraph
06. Norma Jean - If You Got It At Five, You Got It At Fifty
07. Full Of Hell - Fox Womb
08. Ghaust - The Wolf And The Boar
09. Code Orange Kids - IV (My Body Is A Well)
10. Homewrecker - Worms And Dirt
11. Nails - I Will Not Follow
12. Converge - Sadness Coming Home
13. Lower Than Atlantis - Sleeping In The Bath
14. Dead In The Dirt - You Bury Me
15. Birds In Row - Cages
16. Trash Talk - Burn Alive
17. Alice - Semua Yang Kita Sembah Tak Lebih Dari Konstelasi

Pure Noise must be excited with what their bands are doing these days. ” Life Lessons”, the latest release from Harrisburg’s Handguns is a pop punk bullseye. With tons of music to choose from, especially in this genre, picking a start to a new highly anticipated album is crucial. It really has to create a spark, to shape and form the album, similar to, dare I say, an anvil.
The first track off the new record is a quick shot from the hip. Fast, loud, and short. “Anvil” weighing in at 1 minute and 22 seconds picks up where the band left off. We were patiently waiting for the new release, and judging from the first track, we won’t be let down. 
Reloading for the next blast of a song, “Sleep Deprived” keeps Handguns’ going. Fast poppy, and riddled with muted crunching guitars and head nodding drum beats, this song guides us smoothly along to a scream a long pop punk type of breakdown that seemed to dissipate over the years. Way to bring it back boys. With these first two tracks as evidence, Handgun’s hasn’t strayed to far from what they know. What they’ve learned.  And what we love. 
Next in the chamber  “Highway Robbery” holds us up for another pin point accurate pop punk heavy hitter. With lyrics that will surely be shouted by fans across the US, everyone will feel at home and not like they’re wasting away. Fast, in your face, and abruptly ending to make for the perfect get away into one of the more catchy songs on the album. 
Starting off like the first three ” Heart vs. Head” is just on par with how the album is going. Fast guitar and drums we’re almost expecting what will happen. But Handgun’s has a refreshing reload for a moment, breaking out the slowed down sing song chorus. Repeating this fast to slow formula, the Harrisburg five show what they have composition wise with a belted symphonic pop punk “breakdown”. With a swinging baseline to lead us into an open chorded serenade to finish up track four. 
One that we can probably all relate to, as pop punk fans, is ironically titled “I Can’t Relate”. Topics such as happiness, student loans, societies views and living lives for ourselves, are all covered in this shorty but goody. Guaranteed to be a crowd pleaser and dog-pile maker. Don’t lie, you can’t wait to scream ” NO I DON’T, NO I DON’T, NO I!”
Properly living up to the album name “The Loved Ones Who Hate Us” covers exactly that. Wondering if anyone still cares and trying to balance family and friend relationships, Taylor Eby (vocals) carefully orchestrates a call and answer type chorus. With a guest appearance by Soupy of The Wonder Years, the first single off ” Life Lessons” (check out the video if you haven’t, pretty funny) somewhat shifts the gears into a more personal direction the record seems to take from here. 
Bringing in the more spacey and technicality Handguns’ has to offer, “Queens” illustrates the fearlessness the band holds. Upbeat and moving, this one touches on a more physical aspect of life lessons. Getting punched in the face is never fun, but sometimes, a life lesson that needs to be had. 
It’s unclear if there is an unwritten rule in the pop punk handbook, but songs about looking into the past are always the slow jams of the record. Definitely true with “Give and Take”. Not the slowest song you’ll hear by any means, this reminiscent jam is still the slower guy of the album. Catchy and fun, “Give and Take” is a great breather from what Handguns’ has shot off so far.
Touching on the tender subject of losing a loved one is “Waiting For Your Ghost”. With a fun poppy sound, it’s easy to miss the subject matter being belted out. While it may be a tough one to play live, this is without a doubt going to get kids off their feet.
The closing track shows that something was learned from all these life lessons. “New Years Resolution” covers how the world is a testing world and backing down and not putting up a fight is no option. Keeping the “in your face” styled song going strong, “New Years Resolution” is a solid ending choice for the album. Fast verses, heavy hitting choruses, climactic build ups, and vocal driven quotes of positivity. “Life Lessons” has everything wanted in a pop punk album, and is proof that Handguns’ learned this lesson and learned it fast. 

Pure Noise must be excited with what their bands are doing these days. ” Life Lessons”, the latest release from Harrisburg’s Handguns is a pop punk bullseye. With tons of music to choose from, especially in this genre, picking a start to a new highly anticipated album is crucial. It really has to create a spark, to shape and form the album, similar to, dare I say, an anvil.

The first track off the new record is a quick shot from the hip. Fast, loud, and short. “Anvil” weighing in at 1 minute and 22 seconds picks up where the band left off. We were patiently waiting for the new release, and judging from the first track, we won’t be let down. 

Reloading for the next blast of a song, “Sleep Deprived” keeps Handguns’ going. Fast poppy, and riddled with muted crunching guitars and head nodding drum beats, this song guides us smoothly along to a scream a long pop punk type of breakdown that seemed to dissipate over the years. Way to bring it back boys. With these first two tracks as evidence, Handgun’s hasn’t strayed to far from what they know. What they’ve learned.  And what we love. 

Next in the chamber  “Highway Robbery” holds us up for another pin point accurate pop punk heavy hitter. With lyrics that will surely be shouted by fans across the US, everyone will feel at home and not like they’re wasting away. Fast, in your face, and abruptly ending to make for the perfect get away into one of the more catchy songs on the album. 

Starting off like the first three ” Heart vs. Head” is just on par with how the album is going. Fast guitar and drums we’re almost expecting what will happen. But Handgun’s has a refreshing reload for a moment, breaking out the slowed down sing song chorus. Repeating this fast to slow formula, the Harrisburg five show what they have composition wise with a belted symphonic pop punk “breakdown”. With a swinging baseline to lead us into an open chorded serenade to finish up track four. 

One that we can probably all relate to, as pop punk fans, is ironically titled “I Can’t Relate”. Topics such as happiness, student loans, societies views and living lives for ourselves, are all covered in this shorty but goody. Guaranteed to be a crowd pleaser and dog-pile maker. Don’t lie, you can’t wait to scream ” NO I DON’T, NO I DON’T, NO I!”

Properly living up to the album name “The Loved Ones Who Hate Us” covers exactly that. Wondering if anyone still cares and trying to balance family and friend relationships, Taylor Eby (vocals) carefully orchestrates a call and answer type chorus. With a guest appearance by Soupy of The Wonder Years, the first single off ” Life Lessons” (check out the video if you haven’t, pretty funny) somewhat shifts the gears into a more personal direction the record seems to take from here. 

Bringing in the more spacey and technicality Handguns’ has to offer, “Queens” illustrates the fearlessness the band holds. Upbeat and moving, this one touches on a more physical aspect of life lessons. Getting punched in the face is never fun, but sometimes, a life lesson that needs to be had. 

It’s unclear if there is an unwritten rule in the pop punk handbook, but songs about looking into the past are always the slow jams of the record. Definitely true with “Give and Take”. Not the slowest song you’ll hear by any means, this reminiscent jam is still the slower guy of the album. Catchy and fun, “Give and Take” is a great breather from what Handguns’ has shot off so far.

Touching on the tender subject of losing a loved one is “Waiting For Your Ghost”. With a fun poppy sound, it’s easy to miss the subject matter being belted out. While it may be a tough one to play live, this is without a doubt going to get kids off their feet.

The closing track shows that something was learned from all these life lessons. “New Years Resolution” covers how the world is a testing world and backing down and not putting up a fight is no option. Keeping the “in your face” styled song going strong, “New Years Resolution” is a solid ending choice for the album. Fast verses, heavy hitting choruses, climactic build ups, and vocal driven quotes of positivity. “Life Lessons” has everything wanted in a pop punk album, and is proof that Handguns’ learned this lesson and learned it fast. 

Goldfinger X Wasted Mind: The Backyard Loving Tape

Here is selected songs by me and my bud at 01:12 AM. sounds would telling you the thing everyone know about play/download then leave a comment below, have been fallin’ love huh?

- WM

Song List:
01. Mayer Hawthorne - Just Ain’t Gonna Work Out
02. Gorillaz - To Binge
03. Jamie Aditya Graham - Now You’re Gone
04. Craft Spells - After The Moment
05. Flim - Stuck Inside My Head
06. The West Coast Pop Experimental - I Won’t Hurt You
07. Beach Fossils - Daydream
08. Alex Turner - Piledriver Waltz
09. She & Him - Why Do You Let Me Stay Here?
10. Indische Party - Hey Girl
11. Wild Nothing - Live In Dream
12. Renee Olstead - Stars Fell On Alabama
13. Belle & Sebastian - Dress Up In You
14. Bloc Party - This Modern Love
15. The Jesus And Mary Chain - Just Like Honey
16. White Shoes And The Couple Company - Cerita Cita

Watch the Official “Collapse” Gameplay Video for ‘Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare’

Not only did Call of Duty unveil multiplayer action from the upcoming Advanced Warfare game this week at Gamescom, Sledgehammer also showcased another video entitled “Collapse” featuring action from the campaign mode. Call of Duty campaign modes are always a blast and this one appears to be no exception to that. Check out the high speed chase and standoff that takes place on San Francisco’s Golden Gate bridge!

Paris Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2014 Street Style Report.